The German Hungarians & The Schuhplattler

Recently a question came to my committee about how the German Hungarians got to be dancers in the Schuhplattler style and members of the Gauverband Nordamerika. Below are selections from our various written histories telling that story.

Behind Our Name: Part V, by Michael Fricker

In part IV, we discussed the various buildings that our club has called home and the names we gave them. Now this month we will finally tell the story of how our club went from the Banater Männerchor to the United German Hungarians of Philadelphia and Vicinity.

Behind Our Name: Part IV, by Michael Fricker

A club is not a building. It is not a field or a stadium. It is not a bar, a dance floor or a grove. A club is a social gathering of people around common feelings, ideas or goals. You, the members are and always were the club. Naturally, a club needs a gathering place and we have had a variety that we have given numerous names.

Behind Our Name: Part III, by Michael Fricker

In Part II, we expanded the definition of German-Hungarians as an ethnic group. With an eloquent passage from Rudy Rack we described the feeling of community these people gathered around in America. Then in 1922, our athletic club formed and in 1930, it took on the familiar name.

Behind Our Name: Part II, by Michael Fricker

Last week we discussed the Banat, the region that was once the home of our founders and many of our members. We ended on a note that after its founding in 1910, the Banater Männerchor became a rendezvous for all German-Hungarians in Philadelphia.

Behind Our Name: Part I, by Michael Fricker

This essay, originally printed in parts in 2014 in the "Monthly Progress," will take you on a journey to find out the true meaning of who we are and why our names are important. 

The Beginnings of Tradition (Part II), by Mike Stirm II

As a new member of our Cultural Group, I wanted to learn a bit about the history and how this amazing tradition began.

The Beginnings of Tradition (Part I), by Mike Stirm II

As a new member of our Cultural Group, I wanted to learn a bit about the history and how this amazing tradition began.

Why we play in the USLPA, by Michael Fricker

In a climate of American soccer where organizational barriers are nonexistent and there’s a new regional or national league starting up every day, soccer social media is an alphabet soup of teams, leagues and fan sites. So, why do we play in the United League?